Tradition

It has been a generational tradition for nearly 20 years. Learning as babies, they return as adults the following year.

 

In turn, they teach their babies.

 

How many return every year varies. It depends upon the usual factor in nature, the ability to survive. A few that have visited this spring and summer have been doing so the past 3-5 years. You know them by having observed individual physical traits belonging to a robin. When a given robin that has returned so often does not the next spring, it is a little bittersweet in not seeing them. Yet, seeing a new generation of robins says the circle of life is strong. And, nature continues to be strong.

 

This summer, we played “host” to 7-8 baby robins. We eagerly await their return next spring.

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Spring Snow

For about an hour, yesterday afternoon, it appeared the snowstorm was going to be much more serious than forecasted. The snow was falling heavily, the winds were becoming stronger.

 

Many of the birds had already hunkered down in their roosts to wait out the snow. But, there were a few robins that waited out the snow more in the open.

 

A couple hours and two inches later, the heavy snow had relented. The robins, in the open, returned their roosts for the night. During the overnight hours, everything turned into sheets of ice.

 

 

While today felt more like a day in late January or early February, the snow and ice melted away rather quickly under the bright sun. And, the robins were back to their springtime routine.

 

Another sign of spring.

Transitions

The seasonal change in action.

clouds of spring and summer, cumulus-nimbus kind

 

trees beginning to set leaf buds

 

robin visitors

 

trash in the trees

 

The unwelcomed change in season, Red Flag Warnings, the presence of extreme fire conditions.

Calling On Spring

The robins have been around since late February, waiting for warmer weather in their roosts. The year-round robins, they too, have been patiently waiting on the weather. With the temperatures beginning to average at, or above, seasonal norms, they’ve become more visible.

 

 

A few of “our” regular flock have visited for their share of kitty kibble and water on the front porch. And, of course, their visits have excited our feline family members very much.

To hear their songs in the early morning, they bring great pleasure and anticipation that the constancy of warmer days are very near.

Odds & Ends

The “Odd”

Whenever you see a robin, not a feather is out of place. And, is always ready to sing a cheerful song of fine spring weather. On this day, in mid-April 2010, this poor robin was caught in a downpour of a rain/snow mix.

 

The robin took refuge under the eave of our front porch to wait out the weather. He also began the drying out process by fixing his feathers.

 

Though he left a bit damp and with ruffled feathers, he returned later that afternoon completely dry and his feathers nicely back in place.

 

The “&”

 

The End

For the Denver Broncos, last night’s blowout loss in the Super Bowl was not the ending they hoped for. The regular season records for offensive production seemed to be for naught. Not even the “good luck” display of team colors by our neighbor’s outdoor lighting was of much help.

 

The lopsided loss undoubtedly disappointed those loyal Bronco fans, they join the fan base of the other 30 NFL teams in the familiar refrain, “next season will be our time.” The fans will likely fret about the “special magic” during the off-season, wondering whether it can made again.