Happy Birthday Musketeers!

The Musketeers – Maxie, Midnight and Tuxie – are turning 12 today. Time has flown by so quickly. They have grown into fine, loving kitties. Closely bonded, they have kept an eye on each other.

Midnight

Maxie

Tuxie, forever remembered and forever loved

Losing Tuxie, last August, most fortunately Maxie and Midnight handled it well. Whether they had sensed Tuxie’s short time, that can only be surmised. Maxie and Midnight have carried on in true Musketeer tradition.

the rare three-shot (September 2006)

Happy Birthday Musketeers!

xoxo
mom and dad

Advertisements

Happy Birthday Musketeers!

We celebrate our Musketeers, Maxie, Midnight and Tuxie, becoming 11 years old today. When we first saw them as tiny, three-week old kittens, little did we know they would  become part of our family.

And, how have they grown into the beautiful (Midnight) and handsome (Maxie and Tuxie) cats they have become.

Midnight

Maxie

Tuxie

They are a tightly-bonded trio with their own individual personalities. While it doesn’t seem like it on some days, they genuinely look out for one another. When one goes to the vet for their annual check-up, the other two patiently wait at home.

They have earned and wear the title of Musketeer to the fullest.

 

Happy Birthday Musketeers!

xoxo

A Caturday Birthday

Celebrating a birthday today are my Musketeers – Midnight, Maxie and Tuxie. It’s their tenth.

Midnight

 

Maxie

 

Tuxie

 

Gathering them for a group shot is a near impossibility. Having them behave for a “family” portrait, highly unlikely. And, it is not unusual for one, two, or all three, to suddenly become camera shy.

They’ve been great kitties since their kitten days. Lots of fun, full of play.

 

Happy Birthday Musketeers!

Traditional Friday Catblogging

In preparation, may be, for tomorrow morning’s total lunar eclipse before sunrise.

Maxie and Tuxie ready for their sleep

 

Saturday morning’s total lunar eclipse is the third in a “tetrad”, four total lunar eclipses in a row occurring at six month intervals. When the eclipse reaches its maximum, the moon will take on a deep red/rust color – hence the reference to the “blood moon”. Farther west an observer is located, better the view. In the USA, the Eastern and Central Time zones will not see the total lunar eclipse as the moon would have already set and daylight present. In the Mountain Time zone, the first rays of sunrise adding extra color to the sky may make for a special extra viewing of the totally eclipsed moon. The better viewing will be on the West Coast, and the best viewing will be across the Pacific, in Hawaii and points westward into the Western Pacific with darkened skies. The eclipse will be seen in Australia and East Asia on Saturday evening. Like all celestial events, viewing depends on the weather conditions.

For additional information on the eclipse, please read here.

 

Sidebar

If away from the city lights, another sight worth taking in will be the close proximity of the Milky Way. A darker sky will be needed to observe the Milky Way and the eclipse together. The better views will begin on the West Coast (USA), with the best across the Pacific expanse. For additional information on the Milky Way and lunar eclipse viewing in the same sky, please read here.