Easy Like Sunday: Eclipse Day Preview

The anticipation is great. It’s been called the celestial event of the year, and more. And, it begins in a matter of hours.

Its transcontinental path across America is most rare. Not rare is the zone of totality, about 67 miles wide. Outside the zone, a partial eclipse. For example, Grand Teton National Park, lies within the zone of totality but its immediate neighbor to the north, Yellowstone National Park, will experience a 99% partial eclipse. While the experience should be the same whether in Grand Teton or Yellowstone, it has been suggested it is not. Both places of nature’s grandeur will be dark regardless.

click on the map to view the interactive Google eclipse map*

If the plan is to directly observe the eclipse, partial or total, you will need to be properly equipped. The eclipse glasses or handheld viewers should be certified to meet the ISO 12312-2 standard. Many reputable outlets have already sold out their stock. One alternative is to make a DIY cardboard pinhole viewer. The pinhole viewer does work; it is a matter of practicing in the hours before the eclipse. Practice can also be done using a lamp as a substitute for the sun.

The other direct view methods are a telescope or a welder’s lens. For a telescope, a sun filter that attaches to the eyepiece is needed or a sun projection screen. If it is a welder’s lens, a shade 14 lens should be used according to NASA. Anything less does not provide the necessary eye protection. Most welding supply stores have said a shade 14 lens is a special order item.

ready: 400X Jason refractor telescope and kitty station

If the plan also includes to photograph the eclipse, partial or total, you will need to have the proper filtering lens for your camera. A sun filter should be attached to the end of the zoom lens. The stacking of neutral density filters along with polarizing filters will not protect the camera sensor from damage. With the camera essentially turned into a refractor telescope, increasing the optical zoom will decrease its light gathering ability. It will require a judicious use of zoom, ISO speed and aperture to capture a decent image.

The wild card in viewing the eclipse is weather. In general, the forecast is expected to be good to fair. Along the Colorado Front Range, we’re expected to have sky conditions featuring thin, high-level cloudiness. In Casper, WY, the closest point of totality, they are expected to have similar sky conditions. The level of cloudiness maybe enough to provide a momentary glimpse of the sun without protection.

Regardless of approach, a total solar eclipse of this kind should not be missed. If you watch online or television, mute the sound. What matters is your sense of marvel and experience, not the commentator’s.

Note

If you click on the map above, you will redirected to Google’s Interactive Eclipse Map. Combined with their satellite street mapping, you are able to project the eclipse, partial or total, to your street address. At our house, we’re expected to have a partial eclipse of 88.892% at maximum. The shadows are expected to be similar to an early dusk twilight. The eclipse will begin at 10:23:40.7, reaching its maximum at 11:47:55.0, and ending at 13:15:59.4.

Advertisements

Easy Like Sunday

“As they stood there puzzled about this, two men in brilliant clothes suddenly appeared by their side. Terrified, the women bowed their heads to the ground. But, the two said to them, ‘Why look among the dead for someone who is alive? He is not here; he has risen.’ ” (Luke 24: 4-6, The New Jerusalem Bible)

Through His resurrection, He made all things new and He made all things possible.
May your Easter be blessed and holy.

Warming the Ride

With a nice and fairly mild October and November, the weather has finally caught up with the calendar. These early days of December have been decidedly colder, with overnight temperatures in the single digits above zero (° F). Last Friday (Dec 2), a new record of the latest, first measurable snowfall was set, eclipsing the previous record of Nov 28 2010.

As expected, the weekend riding has started later in the morning. In between the riding, hot cocoa kept the girls warm.

before riding: Deborah with perfect nails

hot cocoa break: Tara’s perfect nails staying perfect after an hour of horse grooming

By noon, the heavier outerwear was shed in favor of lighter weight fleece, which makes for better riding. After lunch, it was riding three rounds of exercises until late afternoon. Deborah gave G-Man another ride before settling him down. He did like the idea of working out with Brie, Captain Andrew and SAM. They didn’t seem to mind his presence too much.

staying warm: Elizabeth waiting on Deborah and Tara to load their horses

It appears hot cocoa will be on the training table over the next few weeks.

Easy Loving Sunday

She only has eyes for one. Every so often, she will cast a longing look at her one and only. She walks into a room very quietly, taking her place next to her one. She softly purrs her affection into the ears of her one. Her love is unconditional and unbounded. She also makes sure everyone knows their place, that she is the one and that she is “The Chosen”.

Miss Egypt, always devoted

For her unending devotion, the song, “Eyes For You” from Daryl Hall’s 2011 album, “Laughing Down Crying” which may be viewed here.

Easy Winter Sunday

It was a very early start today with the girls having a groom session with their horses. The early start was necessitated with a winter storm/blizzard beginning later today and tonight. It was snowing fairly heavily when we arrived at the JN Ranch shortly after 5:30 am. Amanda was feeding the horses, hers and ours, their breakfast of premium hay and rolled oats.

With six inches of snow on the ground, there was no plan of letting any horse onto the paddock. Exercise time would consist of walking the horses back and forth the length of Amanda’s barn several times. The more wooly ranch horses, however, they’re a different case. But, they also have a roof attached to their barn.

seen from Amanda’s barn, ranch horses stand next to their barn under the “patio” roof

The horses enjoyed their morning of pampering. Each received a nice brushing, a cleaned stall and fresh bedding, and a fresh horse blanket. Better yet, they had treats of apples and carrots.

Before coming home, Amanda treated us with hot chocolate and mini-marshmallows. A cookie-lover, Amanda didn’t have any cookies on hand. The best she could offer was PB&J sandwiches or pancakes. The hot chocolate was more than enough.

Since coming home, it’s been a slow afternoon. The girls have checked the campus web site a couple times, no delayed start or snow day cancellation just yet.

 

Notes

For those who have adopted named storms not of the tropical variety, The Weather Channel has dubbed this winter storm/blizzard as “Kayla”. Nice name, but we don’t know anyone named “Kayla”.