Easy Like Sunday

“As they stood there puzzled about this, two men in brilliant clothes suddenly appeared by their side. Terrified, the women bowed their heads to the ground. But, the two said to them, ‘Why look among the dead for someone who is alive? He is not here; he has risen.’ ” (Luke 24: 4-6, The New Jerusalem Bible)

Through His resurrection, He made all things new and He made all things possible.
May your Easter be blessed and holy.

A Rider’s Impressions

Written by Elizabeth Ksenia Ramos

The week of everyday practice went well, but we probably could have ridden it better. Though we got off to a non-start with some sketchy winter weather on the first day, we kicked it into gear on the second.

Practice, Day Three: Trish waiting on us (RRC, Mar 26 2017)

Preparing for a season is more than shaking off the rust and losing the bad habits picked up during the off-season. It is about riding with more precision and speed, but also with discipline. While we push ourselves to be better riders, we are careful not to push our horses too hard and ask them to do things they may not be ready to do. Horses, while they aim to please, they, too, need to ease back into the stepped-up pace and difficulty.

The note-taking has been thorough as have our back-and-forth discussions among ourselves and with Trish. She is quite pleased at how well we are riding, and how well our horses have responded to the increased tempo and practice. “You’re showing mid-season form. Can’t ask for anything more.” While her words are very complimentary, Trish knows we have areas that need some work and polishing.

It would be fair to say we accomplished most of the priorities we had set for ourselves. But, it wasn’t all practice. We had a chance to do a few trail rides despite the snow, fog, rain, and wind.

Tara leading the trail ride on a snowy Saturday morning (RRC, Apr 01 2017)

The last practice session of the week was riding the GP qualifier course from the 2016 Las Vegas Nationals. The aim was to ride a faster time than the best time cleanly. Trish had a new class of young, learn-to-ride students (age 5-7) watch our session. Afterwards, we did a Q&A period with the kids. They were great.

Deborah & Comet: in the start area of the GP practice course 1.50 m (RRC, Apr 01 2017)

About the author

Elizabeth Ksenia Ramos will be graduating from the University of Colorado in May (Class of 2017). She will graduate with an ACS certified Bachelor of Science in Chemistry. Elizabeth graduated with honors from Machebeuf Catholic High School in Denver in 2013.

She is the most decorated equestrian in Rustler Riding Club history, winning Rider of the Year, Horse of the Year and Regulator of the Year awards on multiple occasions. Additionally, she has won multiple blue ribbons, and other placement ribbons, with Mr. Ed, Lilith and SAM: Secret Agent Man.

Snow Day

With the 2017 MLB season beginning, it is very appropriate to have challenging springtime weather. (The Rockies’ home opener is Friday, April 7.)

snow-covered: in the neighborhood (Tue, Apr 04 2017)

tree-bending snow: winter white (Tue, Apr 04 2017)

measuring the snow: 6+ inches (Tue, Apr 04 2017)

The snow ended in the late morning, followed by partial clearing in the early afternoon. With temperatures climbing into the mid-40s, the melt off began in earnest.

snow free feeder, nearly dry street (Tue, Apr 04 2017)

In the forecast, sunny and warmer (nearly 70) by Friday.

Happy Birthday Susie and Pinky!

It seems not long ago Miss Susie and Miss Pinky, and their littermates were born. They began their lives in rather humble and difficult surroundings. Through kindness, and a little good fortune, they made their way into feline rescue. “The rest,” it is said, “is history.”

Becoming six, Susie and Pinky, are lots of fun. They are loving and loyal.

favorite chair and perch: Miss Pinky

baby quilt time: Miss Susie

the sunny side: Miss Susie

watching for cats: Miss Pinky

suncatching: Miss Pinky

suncatching: Miss Susie

 

Happy Birthday Susie and Pinky!

xoxo

Blizzard Friday

After 2-3 weeks of spring weather, today was a reminder that winter is not quite over yet. Though we had wind-driven rain at the house and a dusting of snow, points northward to Denver and eastward into the plains were having a blizzard this morning. A certain project appointment, however, had to be kept regardless of the weather conditions.

heading into the plains: an icy SH 94 east of Colorado Springs, which closed 15 minutes later

While Deborah and Tara did some homework, Elizabeth made two chocolate pies. She had to make a pressing call, first, to Laurie at work, “where is the baking chocolate?” Of course, Elizabeth had first taste of her chocolate temptation.

Elizabeth’s first word: “tasty”

Not a bad afternoon treat.

“Thank you, princess.”

Ten Days Of Perfection

During the last week of March, the attention of the horse world will be focused on the FEI World Cup in Omaha. It is the pinnacle of equestrian sports.

Instead, my daughters will be focused on their preparations for their 2017 riding season. Who wins, or does not win, in Omaha does not matter. Who rides well, or who didn’t, does not matter. With their season beginning a scant, six weeks later, in mid-May, it is ten days of everyday riding. It is ten days of requiring their best, and more.

Trish and Cameron visiting: “How are you today?”  (RRC, Mar 11 2017)

They prepare like elite professionals. The practice day is very structured, from beginning to end. Attention to detail is an imperative. Critical analysis is essential. While Trish can leave my girls to practice without much supervision, she watches from the sidelines. Like them, Trish, too, has her notepad in which she jots down her observations. After a segment is completed, the four will compare notes. This kind of off-saddle instruction allows them to have additional insight and analysis of their riding technique. The continual learning, including for a rider competing at the highest level, is a must.

warming up: Tara having a hot drink during a break at practice (RRC, Mar 11 2017)

While the practice sessions seem to be intense, they are fairly relaxed. If any mistakes are made, it is better to have them during practice. The repetitive nature of practice is also a good exercise in building patience and composure, and learning more about their equine partners. It is in championship moments when the hard work and staying disciplined make a difference.

If practice is any indicator, my girls are continuing to ride very well. They are riding fast, crisply and with precision, and have said, “better than last season.” They will know how well when they open their season.

Borrowing a line from their favorite rider, Kent Farrington, “Enjoy the process, not just the end result.” And, that is how they ride.

Elizabeth and SAM: kisses before practice (RRC, Mar 11 2017)