Mow and Trim

With the return of the summer monsoon rains, the thirsty valley has been revived. The prairie grasses are greener. The ponds refreshed. The wildflowers in bloom again. It also means a bit of yard work needs to be done.

morning dew on the prairie (North Ranch, Aug 2018)

Much of our ranch land consists of prairie grasses. It is not much different from when the Johnson and Norris families settled the valley in the 1880s. Closer to the house, we have a mixture of buffalo grass and rye grass, which makes for a nice lawn. Both grass types are drought hardy, preferring dormancy when water is sparse. Similarly, the wildflowers are drought hardy too. The wildflowers are a mix of wild asters (white, pink, and purple), black-eyed Susans, wild bluebell, and more.

prairie yellow wildflower (North Ranch, Aug 2018)

A factory reconditioned Kubota B2320 with a mid-mount mower deck, front loader bucket and a rotary cutter keeps our place trimmed. In the more tighter spots, the lawn mower and weed whacker works the best. It isn’t necessary to mow and trim every square inch; it’s impractical. The paddocks receive the lightest of trims, which keeps the more noxious growth away from the horses. In manicured settings, foxtail, thistle, and a few other invasive weeds are more likely to gain a foothold. They become a significant problem if they enter into the grazing cycle. Also,  greener grasses are more difficult for a horse to digest.

Kubota B2320 (North Ranch, Oct 2017)

After the ranch complex has been nicely mowed and trimmed, the next mow and trim may be 4-6 weeks later. It’ll depend largely how much rain falls during the interval.

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